Types to Watch 2021: Community, Part 1

Reading Time: 5 minutes

Each year, British Log of Photography presents its   Ones To Watch – an array of 20 emerging image-makers, chosen from a list of nearly 450 nominations. Collectively, they provide the window into where pictures is heading, at least within the eyes of the curators, publishers, agents, festival producers plus photographers we invited in order to nominate. Throughout the next couple weeks, we will be sharing profiles of the 20 photographers, originally published in the latest issue of BJP, delivered immediate with an 1854 Subscription .  

Nominated by our Ones to Watch 2021, we present the very first chapter of our Ones to view: Community featuring Agnieszka Sosnowska, Stephanie Kulisch, Agustin Hernandez, Kristina Sergeeva, Miki Hasegawa and Michelle Piergoelam

Agnieszka Sosnowska

Nominated by Donavon Smallwood

“If I actually try to create images with the goal of a ‘project’ in mind, then the photographs stay inside those lines, ” Agnieszka Sosnowska explains. “When I have worked that way in the past – it destroyed my method of looking, and I nearly gave up photography. ” The Polish American photographer, who lifestyles on a farm in East Iceland, works with her local community, capturing the ebb and flow associated with rural life. What began as a process of assimilating to some new country has progressed into a life-changing collaboration.  

The sensation of stillness is one of the most magnetic qualities of Sosnowska’s work. Her images of people and their environments trade in the world of feelings, energy and symbolism: twisting bodies in the boot of a car, a ghostly apparition associated with sea spray, a man tenderly holding skinned reindeer feet close to his chest. Jointly they describe our dangerous, symbiotic coexistence with character and what it means to take up this moment of rupture without any sign of restoration. “Her work reminds myself of a soft mixture of Andrea Modica, Barbara Bosworth, and Vanessa Winship, ” states Donavon Smallwood, who nominated Sosnowska. “She seems to live a modest life of grace and art. ”

sosphotographs. com

© Agnieszka Sosnowska.

© Agnieszka Sosnowska.

© Agnieszka Sosnowska.

Stephanie Kulisch

Selected by Muhammad Salah

Flughafensee , an ongoing series by Stephanie Kulisch, explores the short-term communities that occupy the location around a lake near Berlin’s Tegel Airport. For the last 6 years, she has spent time among the winding footpaths, beaches and woodland, forming associations and making work with a numerous strangers. “It is a place of retreat and a point associated with reference for many different people, ” Kulisch explains. “I’ve fulfilled German Turks like Ahmed, the former acrobat Galina, refugee children, and inmates from your nearby prison. I’m thinking about the ways people shape this environment and a feeling of belonging that may not always be beautiful. ”

Throughout her practice, Kulisch utilizes landscapes to evoke internal states. Tender portraits plus subtle observations create a reflection of everyday life that goes beyond the surface and begins to unravel the tension that lingers beneath. In Flughafensee , this manifests across the politics of space – the act of coming together and the endless ways we seek refuge and release. “What I like regarding Kulisch is the way the girl focuses on quiet, atmospheric occasions, rather than strong symbols or grand gestures, ” Muhammad Salah explains in his candidate selection. “Her work presents the draw to everyday occasions where she uses gentle and shade as a structural and storytelling element. ”

stefaniekulisch. com/

© Stefanie Kulisch.

© Stefanie Kulisch.

© Stefanie Kulisch.

© Stefanie Kulisch.

Agustin Hernandez

Selected by Clifford Prince King

“As a first-generation andersrum (umgangssprachlich) Mexican-American, I learned methods to exist in a highly manly culture as a sensitive plus feminine boy, ” says Agustin Hernandez. Growing up encircled by the pressure of residing up to machismo ideals within a devout Catholic community pushed him to suppress his true identity from a young age – until he discovered photography. Ever since, he has been driven by a passionate behavioral instinct to defy the popular and create his own vision associated with desire.  

“I’ve had the opportunity to manifest a place where I found peace away from the particular social standards our societies have ingrained in us, ” Hernandez explains. “A place where our distinctions aren’t a major factor, beauty has no boundaries and acceptance, and inclusivity is key. ” Hernandez’ images the people and objects that occupy his life, seeking out moments associated with fragile and imperfect beauty. After years of repressing their feminine impulse, his work has become a vessel for the mental landscape of self – an empowering act associated with release and liberation. “His vision is so recognisable, ” says Clifford Prince King. “I believe it’s really special when an artist trusts themselves in their process plus continues to push their innovative practices forward independently, no matter outside influences. ”

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© Agustin Hernandez.

© Agustin Hernandez.

© Agustin Hernandez.

Kristina Sergeeva

Selected by Kristina Rozhkova

Fascinated with unravelling personal histories as well as the cognitive distortions of belief, the Russian photographer Kristina Sergeeva makes work regarding the unknown aspects of the human psyche. In her first guide How Sasha Litvinov Buried The Gun , she explores the idea of postmemory –  an expression coined by Professor Marianne Hirsch, describing the relationship that the following generation bears to the private, collective, and cultural trauma of those who came before. Sergeeva lost her grandfather (Sasha Litvinov) when she was five years old. When her parents disposed of his belongings, she desperately restored a box of their things, in an attempt to stay with your pet after he had gone. Through the documentation of his private effects, Sergeeva wrestles with all the phenomenon of memory as well as its influence on the present.  

Rupture and distortion fill Sergeeva’s frames, animating the particular anxiety of modern life. Within the project Shunya , she takes this a step further, attempting to grapple with the contradictions of anxiety brought on by an era of electronic noise. Informed by intellectual science and linguistics, the task is indicative of our current cultural moment and its lasting impacts. “She conveys subtleties of feeling that I are really drawn to, ” points out Kristina Rozhkova, who selected Sergeeva. “The work offers such a tactile quality, I simply want to touch it. ”

kristina-sergeeva. ru/ 

© Kristina Sergeeva.

© Kristina Sergeeva.

© Kristina Sergeeva.

© Kristina Sergeeva.

Miki Hasegawa

Nominated by Kenji Chiga

From the very young age, I sensed that being a child and also a woman made it difficult to live in Japanese society, ” Miki Hasegawa says. “I was very aware of the many types of discrimination. ” Her series, Internal Notebook , grapples with the lived experience of individuals who grew up in abusive homes and the disastrous after-effects of their trauma. Up to date by alarming statistics about child death due to mistreatment, Hasegawa’s photographs do the immediate work of facing complex and violent realities that will continue to remain unseen or even overlooked.  

Through a constellation of portraits, drawings, journal entries and family photographs, Hasegawa pieces together individual narratives validating the invisible injuries that haunt the particular lives of her topics. “They suffer depression, self-harm, dissociation, panic attacks, PTSD, as well as other ailments, ” she points out. “But one cannot observe these injuries unless one particular actively looks for them. ” The work encapsulates the kind of vulnerable storytelling that can shift thinking and demand action. “I have a lot of respect for her work, ” explains Kenji Chiga, who nominated Hasegawa. “It is based on thorough study and sincere confrontation with her subjects on problems that are difficult to visualise. ”

miki-hasegawa. com

© Miki Hasegawa.

© Miki Hasegawa.

© Miki Hasegawa.

Michelle Piergoelam

Nominated by Alex Blanco

For Michelle Piergoelam, Photography is a companion within the journey to trace and discover her Surinamese heritage. The Rotterdam-based artist combines social traditions, oral histories, and forgotten stories with an extremely conceptual approach to access the particular unfamiliar and the unknown.

“Photography enables me to transform thoughts into images, ” she shares. “My imagination takes over and creates occasions and places where I had never been before. ” Steeped in symbolism, the girl rich and poetic pictures reference the unfixed character of identity, history plus truth. Through a continuum of gestures that remain available to interpretation she is witnessing important cultural histories.

Through The untangled tales , Piergoelam visualises the particular traditions of Anansi storytellers and Angisa-folders, honouring their rituals of communication during years of slavery. “Tales had been told that everyone can hear, but not everyone could understand, ” she points out. “Angisa’s worn by ladies were not only beautiful headkerchiefs, but their intricate folds also contained hidden stories and wisdom that could only be read by those who had learned to. ” Passed on from generation to generation, these coded stories plus actions enabled the captive to express themselves without understanding or consequence from their plantation owners. “The project not only preserves the intangible traditions, ” Alex Blanco, which nominated Piergoelam, shares. “But most importantly, allows us to face an essential and heavy subject as slavery. ”

michellepiergoelam. com

© Michelle Piergoelam.

© Michelle Piergoelam.

© Michelle Piergoelam.

Gem Fletcher

Creative director, writer, podcaster and photo director, Jewel Fletcher works across visual-cultural fields, focusing on emerging talent in contemporary photography and art. She is the photograph director of Riposte Mag, and hosts a photography podcast, The Messy Truth.

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